The Mediterranean Diet Roundtable,

on April 9, will focus on the positive impact on health and well-being, from a scientific, cultural and culinary point of view, while offering a one-of-a-kind opportunity to network with the industry’s opinion leaders, media, importers and distributors.

The first Mediterranean Diet Roundtable will bring together doctors and nutritionists along with food industry professionals, manufacturers, trade organizations and agencies as well as foodservice representatives in an effort to increase the presence of healthy foods of the Mediterranean diet in American cuisine and provide a better understanding of the health and commercial value of offering this diet in a variety of settings.

The event that will take place in New York on April 9, will focus on the positive impact on health and well-being, from a scientific, cultural and culinary point of view, while offering a one-of-a-kind opportunity to network with the industry’s opinion leaders, media, importers and distributors.

roundtable-to-offer-practical-peertopeer-approach-to-mediterranean-diet-mdrlogo01101411“The Roundtable is possibly the first event in the U.S. Food Industry that tries to bring the topic of the Mediterranean Diet to a really practical level,” noted Daniela Puglielli, founder of the initiative. “While there are many scientific conferences and trade shows on the topic, there has not been a thorough discussion with a peer-to-peer approach.” Sessions will also cover topics such as menu engineering, food display strategies, market trends and segmentation, the latest FDA regulations and food safety issues.

Dr. Artemis Simopoulos, founder and president of the Center for Genetics, Nutrition and Health and author of The Omega Diet, explained: “Research suggests that the Mediterranean diet, especially the traditional diet of Crete prior to 1960, is best for heart health and overall health for Americans.”

With the scientific evidence behind it, the Mediterranean diet can be an ideal eating pattern not only for the general population but also for specific disease states. The recent report by the U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee is recommending a Mediterranean style diet for the first time. A good understanding of its application is seen as an important step for food, nutrition and health professionals.



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