Olive Pomace Oil: Not What You Might Think

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While extra virgin olive oil is often denoted as being “first cold-press,” what is termed “pomace oil” cannot even qualify as being “second press.” Once the typical, mechanized extraction of olive oil from the olive fruit is complete, some 5-8 percent of the oil still remains in the leftover olive pulp or “pomace.” Although the pomace oil that is extracted is still technically oil that comes from olives, this is done via the use of chemical solvents, and therefore should never be termed, directly or indirectly, as olive oil.

The International Olive Council, the intergovernmental organization responsible for outlining quality standards and monitoring olive oil authenticity, clearly defines olive oil as, “oil obtained solely from the fruit of the olive tree, to the exclusion of oils obtained using solvents or re-esterification processes.”[1] The amount of oil contained in the leftover pomace, which consists of the solid remains of the olive including skins, pulp, seeds, and stems, is so minimal that it cannot be extracted by pressing, but only through the combined use of chemical solvents (like Hexane) and extremely high heat.

Olive Pomace Oil: Not What You Might Think | Olive Oil TimesThis very process, the same high heat technique used in producing canola, sunflower, and other vegetable oils, is why unregulated olive pomace oil sometimes contain harmful components known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) like benzopyrene, which research has shown to be highly carcinogenic and mutagenic. Benzopyrenes result from the incomplete combustion of the fats present in the olives. When fats are exposed to levels of high heat, like in the pomace oil extraction processes where there is no complete combustion and no smoke is produced, benzopyrenes are likely to be produced as a result.

The process to extract olive pomace oil is as follows: a chemical solvent is first administered to the olive pomace which has the ability to dissolve the fats but not the rest of the solid pomace. This application extracts the oil and then afterward, in a refining process, the product is heated so the solvent evaporates completely and cleanly without leaving any sort of harmful residue — so long that this heating method does not exceed 90 degrees Celsius (194 degrees Farenheit). Using this system, the final product is not likely to contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) like benzopyrene.

The risk of benzopyrene contamination occurs when the heating method used to evaporate the solvent exceeds 300 degrees Celsius (572 degrees Farenheit). In these instances, the fat is liquefied into fluid and then drips out of the olive pomace, but the problem is that the insanely high heat results in the partial combustion of the oil with the rest of the physical pomace. This can cause the rapid accumulation of benzopyrenes in the final product.[2]

In instances of heat applications above 300 degrees Celsius, the resulting oil comes with a definite health risk for consumers which depends entirely on the aggressiveness of the heat treatment as well as the amount and frequency of the pomace oil consumed. Because the degree of contamination depends on the type of treatment used, it is necessary for health authorities to clarify what kind of treatment has been applied to produce particular pomace oils and to establish a permissible limit of the amount of benzopyrenes present.

Benzopyrenes, being themselves highly reactive fats, can dissolve easily into cellular membranes and thereby enter a cell’s interior. This resulting action has been shown to cause either intracellular oxidation–the aging and death of cells–or an intoxication which results in the mutagenesis of the genetic material in the cell’ s nucleus. In some instances, this of course spreads as an uncontrolled multiplication of damaged cells which can result in a cancerous tumor.

Concerned about the levels of PAHs like benzoyprene in pomace oil, the Spanish government introduced a temporary ban on pomace oil in July of 2001 and halted all exports of pomace oil until  tests were conducted and limits of the allowable amounts of PAH’s present in the oil were made concrete.

Other countries followed suit: the New Zealand Health and Food Safety authority recalled olive pomace oil from several manufacturers[3] and the German ministry acted similarly issuing this warning: “As a preventative health protection measure, the ministry for consumer affairs, nutrition and agriculture has appealed to the German states and industry to review the remains of the 170 tons of Spanish olive-pomace oil and products containing this oil.”[4]

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This article was last updated December 27, 2011 - 8:34 AM (GMT-5)

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  • Tanya

    Dear Mr. Williams,

    Your article is comprehensive and well researched. However, it seems to be limited to certain markets only. While conceding that olive pomace oil has a better lipid profile in comparison to other oils extracted by the same method (used more widely and frequently than the more expensive extra virgin olive oil), you still relegate it to a position where it can only be used for cosmetic purposes.

    In the case of markets like India (mentioned in your article) where extra virgin olive oil is never used in everyday cooking as its distinct flavor doesn’t blend well with native spicy curries, the use of olive pomace oil with its high MUFA levels, high smoke point and neutral flavour, actually serves as a good replacement to other traditional oils (groundnut oil, sunflower oil, safflower oil, mustard oil, clarified butter, etc.). In markets such as these where the organoleptic qualities of a good quality extra virgin oil are actually not desirable, it would seem that the olive oil industry’s mantra of “extra virgin or nothing” would prove counterproductive.

    For these markets, the question is not as to whether one should buy Olive Pomace Oil as opposed to Extra Virgin Olive Oil, but is whether one should buy Olive Pomace Oil as opposed to Groundnut, Safflower or Sunflower oil. Here, the answer is definitely: Yes.

  • Yosuf

    Thank you Mr. Daniel Williams for your informative article. Thank you for your effort to aware us all against the deceit that some olive oil companies are doing. Since our early history, folks/civilizations had been using olive oil for tonic, medicine, cooking, dressing, massage – And it had always been the first press (virgin) olive oil.

    There was no concept of using chemical treated pomace oil. European olive oil from Spain, Italy got banned for sometime in many countries in the past, because their Pomace Oil was causing cancer to people in the Middle East. After lengthy research the Spanish scientists detected themselves, that it was the reaction of chemical/solvent mixing in the olive pulp/leftover that caused the harm.

    Pomace oil is also available in different tricky/misleading names such as 100% pure olive oil, refined olive oil , olive oil light. These are allfFood-fraud.

    It would also be unfair to say that it is better to buy pomace oil than sun flower oil. Pomace is harmful oil, while sun flower oil from your local town presser (or any trusted name) is second best edible oil after, virgin olive oil.

    Just because many Indians don’t know much about olives, doesn’t mean some companies can sell them junk oil. The second and further press of olive oil is only appropriate for making olive soaps. This is how the first soap makers in Syria have been doing it, since BC’s.

    Whether it is eaten raw or cooked , virgin olive oil is the best option.

    Blessed Tree !
    Blessed Fruit !
    Blessed Oil!
    How blessed are we, indeed.

  • Tanya

    Dear Yosuf,

    The sunflower oil consumed by the overwhelming majority of households around the world is not “pressed” but is solvent extracted, as are all standard vegetable oils as well as olive pomace oil. In light of this, it is absolutely fair and correct to say that olive pomace oil is a better alternative to sunflower oil.

    Further, my point was not that Indians don’t know what olive oil is, my point was that they do not like the taste of olive oil in their food. Hence olive pomace oil being a neutral oil with a good lipid profile is a healthy alternative to other oils like sunflower oil. I guarantee you, all the standard edible vegetable oils produced in India are solvent extracted, and every household consumes them as “local town pressers” are non existent here.

    Also, olive pomace oil has been consumed even in traditional olive producing regions even since the technology to produce it became available.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mehjabeen-Taj-Aalam/100001190735296 Mehjabeen Taj Aalam

      Hi Tanya,

      Your comment is detailed and convincing. The famous wada pav that almost the entire population of Mumbai enjoys, is mainly fried in Palm oil which is the deadliest of all. I guess, the olive pomace oil is a lesser evil than many refined oils that we use in our household.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mehjabeen-Taj-Aalam/100001190735296 Mehjabeen Taj Aalam

      Also, in light of your analysis, the only pinching factor here is the price. If Olive pomace oil is only as good as our refined oils, why should we pay a premium for it, which is as much as 3 times! Its better we stick to our refined oils or kachi gahni :)

  • Saima athar

    i wan to ask whether i shoul use extra virgi oil or pomace oil for arthritis(body pain in joints like knee)

    • http://thekencook.com Ken Cook

      It is used in many soaps included hand made “100% organic” soaps. To my knowledge olive oil alone does nothing special for arthritis but the addition of capsaicin oils, for example, may yield a benefit.

  • MR

    Dear Mr. Williams,

    Thank you for your article. I wonder, though, if olive pomace oil might contain benzopyrenes (which, as you mention can dissolve easily into cellular membranes), is it still considered safe to use for soaps and other cosmetic purposes where it is applied directly on the skin?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mehjabeen-Taj-Aalam/100001190735296 Mehjabeen Taj Aalam

    Dear Daniel,

    Your article was an eyeopener. Just like your mom was swayed by the price and look of the bottle, so was I. I ended up buying 5L and by now have consumed 3! Sadly, for all this while i kept thinking about what ‘pomace’ stands for but never bothered to find out until today. The brand I have is the one imported from Spain so am fearing if its the stock imported before the ban. Here in India, not much is known about olive oil except the fact that it is healthier and hence costlier. Refined oils rule most kitchens as  they are 10 times cheaper than EVOO. 

    Well, thanks to you, no more olive pomace oil from now!

    Mehjabeen Taj.

    • Amudhan

       Pomace is nothing but the remain available after the first crush of olive fruit and some solvent is added to this remains and the remaining oil is extracted and this is what known as olive pomace oil

  • Anonymous

    I accidently bought 4 ltr.of pomance Olive Oil,Thanks to some research on the Net , I found out the true meaning of Pomance olive Oil,and the Negative approch for your Health.
    I think when you are in the Supermarket to buy Olive Oil,please don’t look at the price,rather look for quality also and not from which country it came from.

    • VN DALMIA

      For a true and fair picture of olive pomace oil, the positives and negatives, please these FAQs: http://indolive.org/IOA-newsletter-2009-Sep.pdf

    • anupam sharma

      product kafi mehnga hai

  • Carlos

    very good article explaining the real trurth abt pomace oil and other vegetable oils like sunflower, soya, corn, canola oils production extraction with solvents. They all are not so good for human health.
    At the end, cheap oils are very expensive, really on health price and tasting profiles.
    rgds. carlos – Spain

  • David

    I have been advising all of my EVOO loving friends and colleagues of the dangers of the filthy oil sold as pomace. Amazing that chefs still use it.. 

  • http://www.chrisaylmer.weebly.com chris aylmer

    I always use extra virgin olive oil for anything other than deep frying, e.g., on salads, pasta, drizzling over savoury meals and sauteeing.  However you need to be careful using EVOO or other oils with a low smoke point for deep frying.  They can burn and merely end up producing the very harmful hydrocarbon products you are talking about.  If you use a lower temperature you get soggy, oily potato chips(UK)/ French fries(US) which are no better for you and you have to cook them longer which can add to the deterioration of the oil and waste energy and time. 
    Now I realise that not many people deep fry food at home these days and are apparently proud to announce it……though I’m sure many of them buy oven-ready chips or often order deep fried food in take-aways or restaurants!  I prefer to make my own at home…I don”t trust the type or freshness of the oil they use in restaurants.  It often repeats on me.  An oil with a high smoke point is what you need so the food fries quickly and crisply with a golden colour and there is no burning.  I tried virgin red palm oil but it smokes like mad anything above 160 deg C(320 F) and is solid at room temperature which makes filtering awkward and messy. At 160 degC you get soggy chips. 190 degC(374 F) is an ideal temperature for deep frying potatoes.
    So what to use for deep frying at home?…not EVOO I would say…could be damaged by the heat and is very pricey.  Nor mainly polyunsaturated oils like sunflower for the same reason. You’re left with mono-unsaturated oils or mainly saturated fats.  Mainly saturated fats like ghee, lard or coconut oil will be very stable and resist peroxidation unlike most unsaturated oils. I’m not of the opinion that they are bad for your health, but nearly everyone seems to buy that story. The main problem from my point of view is filtering them of the burnt mess that accumulates in frying oil from batter, breadcrumbs and flour etc….that burnt mess IS apparently bad for you.
    I’m almost afraid to admit that I do find refined oils give much better results for deep frying.  Rapeseed oil works well and peanut oil if you can find it in large bottles.  Olive pomace oil too.  I wonder if these oils can be found at reasonable value without the use of solvents to extract them e.g., by mechancal means and high pressure.  In wine production, they use the pomace(in this case left over pressed grapes) to make a quite prized form of brandy called marc.  They press the left-over grapes at high pressure and do not use solvents as far as I know.  I like the idea of not wasting anything.  So surely you could put olives under great pressure to extrude the last of the oil without heating overmuch or using solvent?

  • Joytrusts

    Thanks for this information.  I purchased a 3-Qt. can with the drawing of a large tree with what looks like olives hanging on the branches.  Although I have not seen the word “olive” printed on the can.  It also did not mention that solvents such as benzopyrene was used, nor did I see that it came from the pulp of the tree.  It did mention “Product of Italy” and it was cheaper than the Olive Oil. I did use the oil, but I thought that I had better check it out on the net before purchasing more, glad I did. Don’t want any more.The first thing I noticed, while pouring, the weight, Pomace Oil appears heavier than the extra virgin olive oil. 

    • Chrisaylmer

      Be careful that the pomace oil you buy is not blended pomace oil i.e. olive pomace oil blended with other vegetable oils…these are the type often seen in large tin cans.  They are usually blended with rapeseed oil or soya oil and this changes the profile of the types of fats in the oil.  Olive oil of any type is exceptionally low in polyunsaturates.

  • KingOfCalifornia

    At least in Spain they had the honesty to label this as “Pomce”. Here in the US, it would be labeled “Extra Virgin” and the “Made in Italy” claim would add three bucks to the price.

  • VN Dalmia

    Actually, its way better than our refined oils because it has the same beneficial or good fat-monounsaturated fat-as other olive oils: 75 to 80% of MUFA. MUFA reduces total cholesterol and LDL. It also has the lowest saturated or bad fat (< 10%). The only way it is similar to our other refined oils is the method of extraction-it is solvent extracted just as they are. 

  • Ramachandran

    Thank you Mr.Williams for the facts about Olive Pomace Oil, but please let us know which grade of Olive Oil is best suited for Indian cooking.

  • Chef Leonardo

    Dear Mehjabeen
    Taj Aalam

     

    The price
    tag of olive oil often pinches but it doesn’t have to! Here are some facts:

     

    1.       1. Olive
    pomace oil is as much as half the price of extra virgin olive oil. Perfect for
    frying and Indian cooking, it is actually quite affordable too!

    2.       2. Olive
    pomace oil is used in one-third the quantity of other refined oils. Because of
    its high smoking point, it can also be re-used up to three times. Therefore,
    its effective price is up to one-ninth its original price!

    3.       3. Olive
    pomace oil is much, much superior to traditional refined oils. It has the same
    beneficial fat composition as extra virgin olive oil and olive oil – that is, the
    highest monounsaturated “good” fatty acids amongst all edible oils and very low
    saturated “bad” fatty acids. Therefore, it prevents heart disease, high
    cholesterol, diabetes, cancer and much more. When used correctly, there is
    almost no price difference between olive pomace oil and traditional refined
    oils. But even if there was, it is a small price to pay for such an immense
    health benefit.

    4.       4. Even
    if you don’t use olive pomace oil in one-third the quantity, there is a very
    small price difference from other refined oils. How? Let me put it this
    way. Imagine that a family of 5 uses 3 litres of sunflower or safflower oil for
    Rs 150 per litre which adds up to Rs 450 per month. Whereas, 3 litres of Olive
    Pomace Oil is for Rs 400 per litre adding up to Rs 1200. A mere monthly
    difference of Rs 750! A small price to pay for good health and longevity. Not
    convinced? Let me explain further. The difference of Rs 750 is basically Rs 25
    per day for one family. A meager Rs 5 per day per individual! Olive Pomace Oil
    ensures the health of all the individuals in the family by an increased
    expenditure of Rs 5 only. Isn’t that a better deal? That is less than 1 paan, 1
    cigarette, 1 chewing gum and much less than popcorn, chips, and so forth.

    5.       5. Regarding
    kachi ghani, please note that mustard oil contains very high erucic acid, which
    raises blood urea levels and can cause edema and dropsy. A simple google search
    will show you that mustard oil is banned in Europe and North America.

     

    The best
    way to be convinced is to actually start using it. You can buy olive pomace oil
    online here: http://www.dalmiaglobal.com
    . After a few months, you will realize that the price has not affected you at
    all and that your overall health has improved!

     

  • Vickie Carroll

    It is stated in this article that Pomace Olive Oil may be used in soap making. Would you suggest that ingesting this oil is a possible carcinogenic but using it as a soap on the skin is not?

  • C.V.Purushothaman

    Thank you, informative. I was under a different impression.

  • Gale

    I for one will never buy this kind of oil again.  It will be used only for non edible situations.  The brand purchased was Botticelli and the word pomace was smaller and lighter print then the words olive oil.  It’s time to get rid of the sneakiness.
    Thanks for the article it certainly opened my eyes. 

  • Marc

    I purposely purchase olive pomace oil for about $20/gallon and use it as my standard, neutral vegetable cooking oil.  Other than Avocado oil (which is expensive and does impart flavor), the fat profile is better and the smoke point is higher than any other vegetable oil, all of which are also extracted using the exact same chemical processing methods.

    If even a fraction of the hysteria on this thread were based in reality, one would think you would see people dropping dead left and right from consuming anything but first cold pressed oils.

  • David

    Anyone using olive pomace oil should also read up on the effects of benzene on the human body. It is the product, added by oil companies to petrol, in place of lead, to increase the octane of lower grade fuel, and is poisonous and cumulative in humans.

  • Mirandax

    Pomace is a less expensive grade of olive oil fom secondary pressing of the pulp left over from the first pressing (extra virgin). It has a higher smoke point and is often mixed with canola for deep frying and other types of high temperature cooking.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Bhavna-Pant/100000795606682 Bhavna Pant

    Is extra virgin olive oil is good for Indian cooking ? i mean can we cook vegetable in it ?

    • Himani, Leonardo Olive Oil

      Dear Bhavna

      Extra virgin olive oil is fine for Indian cooking as long as – 

      1) You do not mind the olive flavour – some people like it, some people find it to interfere with authentic Indian flavors.

      2) You do not mind paying the higher price.

      3) You are not planning to do high heat cooking or deep frying. Extra virgin has a smoking point of 180 degrees C. So, it should not be taken above that temperature. Olive Oil is 220 degrees. Olive pomace oil is 238 degrees. Other refined oils are around 210-220.

      As long as you are ok with the above, extra virgin is perfectly good for cooking vegetables in.

  • Amudhan

    You are having unnecessary hatred for Olive pomace oil, there is not much difference between olive and olive pomace oil, especially in its  nutritional content, i can’t understand from where you got your information.  Please refer Wikipedia, they are having an excellent article on olive pomace oil

  • Rajesh Ahuja03

    Hi,

    I read somewhere that you should keep changing edible oil after some time. Is it rite..?

  • Sanjeev

    Read somewhere that Pomace Oil is very dicey since the processing needs to be very well controlled and not all oil meals are equipped properly. Can’t understand why one should use it – it is not so much cheaper

    • Himani, Leonardo Olive Oil

      Hi Sanjeev

      Please do not believe everything you read about oils on the internet. There is a lot of semi-literate nonsense around. In any case, where your concern about processing is concerned: you will be quite safe if you buy a reputed brand.

      Olive Pomace Oil is half the price of Extra Virgin and much cheaper than Olive Oil as well. But, if price is not a concern, it is perfectly safe to use either of those for cooking as well. 

      At the same time, price is not the only reason to use Pomace. Extra Virgin and Olive Oil are not neutral in flavour. Olive Pomace Oil is. 

      Please also note the smoking points of all 3 grades:

      Extra Virgin – 190 degrees centigrade
      Olive Oil – 220 degrees centigrade
      Olive Pomace Oil – 240 degrees centigrade

      Indian cooking involves a lot of high heat cooking and deep frying. Smoking points should be kept in mind in this regard.

  • Massagegod

    I don’t understand why people, experts, researchers, think it is safe to use these products on the skin but not internally. They produce medication now in transdermal patches because it is more effective and efficient to allow the chemical to absorb directly through the skin into the bloodstream rather than through the gastro-intestinal tract. Please tell me how these carcinogenic chemicals could possibly be safe on the skin.

  • Koshy

    Thank you very much for the informative article. I am an avid used of Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Recently a friend of mine presented me a two liter pack of Refined Olive Pomace Oil blended with Extra Virgin Olive Oil from Italy. The percentage of  extra virgin oil is not mentioned on the package. That made me look up for information. Thank you.

  • Vikky

    Dear Mr.Williams,

    Thanks for you informative article. You saved me as i was about buy 10L of Olive pomace oil. So far i am using EVOO but found out that this cheaper version is available in market. Now because of your article i know exactly why this is cheaper then an EVOO.

    • Divya

      Dear Vikky,

      Extra virgin olive oil and olive pomace oil are two different grades and the process of extracting them is different, resulting in the difference in pricing as well. EV is extracted from hand plucked olives which are cold pressed (temp below 25 degrees) within 24 hrs. This process is much costlier compared to the olive pomace oil extraction process, olive pomace oil is extracted from the pulp of the olive fruit after the extraction of virgin olive oil.

      I agree with Mr. Williams’s comment about the flavour and aroma of olive pomace oil. It is definitely not the grade to be used if you want to savour the flavour and aroma of olive oil in your food. One should use Extra Virgin Olive Oil for this purpose. On the other hand olive pomace oil’s neutral taste & flavour and high smoke point make it perfect for your day to day cooking, for grilling, roasting, baking, sautéing, shallow frying and most importantly deep frying as well!!

      But I disagree when he says that olive oil was banned in 2001, that’s not the complete story. The rumor originates in incidents that took place in Spain in 2001 when the level of benzopyrene in some Olive Pomace Oil was alleged to be high. Benzopyrene is an aromatic hydrocarbon and is commonly seen as the black substance on the surface of burnt toast. No standard for benzopyrene existed at that time (the current permitted level is 2 ppm). Despite that, the Spanish Government confiscated all Olive Pomace Oil. The action was challenged in court. The Supreme Court finally decided that all government action was illegal and the government had to pay 12 million euro as damages to the affected company.

      We basically need to understand the three different grades and their different uses. Choose your grade wisely, and you can enjoy great health and taste without being worried!!

    • Divya

      Dear Vikky,

      Extra virgin olive oil and olive pomace oil are two different grades and the process of extracting them is different, resulting in the difference in pricing as well. EV is extracted from hand plucked olives which are cold pressed (temp below 25 degrees) within 24 hrs. This process is much costlier compared to the olive pomace oil extraction process, olive pomace oil is extracted from the pulp of the olive fruit after the extraction of virgin olive oil.

      I agree with Mr. Williams’s comment about the flavour and aroma of olive pomace oil. It is definitely not the grade to be used if you want to savour the flavour and aroma of olive oil in your food. One should use Extra Virgin Olive Oil for this purpose. On the other hand olive pomace oil’s neutral taste & flavour and high smoke point make it perfect for your day to day cooking, for grilling, roasting, baking, sautéing, shallow frying and most importantly deep frying as well!!

      But I disagree when he says that olive oil was banned in 2001, that’s not the complete story. The rumor originates in incidents that took place in Spain in 2001 when the level of benzopyrene in some Olive Pomace Oil was alleged to be high. Benzopyrene is an aromatic hydrocarbon and is commonly seen as the black substance on the surface of burnt toast. No standard for benzopyrene existed at that time (the current permitted level is 2 ppm). Despite that, the Spanish Government confiscated all Olive Pomace Oil. The action was challenged in court. The Supreme Court finally decided that all government action was illegal and the government had to pay 12 million euro as damages to the affected company.

      We basically need to understand the three different grades and their different uses. Choose your grade wisely, and you can enjoy great health and taste without being worried!!

  • Sheema

    Now i realize  real olive oil. then i want to know the use of pomace olive oil.

    • Divya

      Dear Sheema,

      All three
      grades of Olive Oil, namely: Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Olive Oil, and Olive
      Pomace Oil are extracted from olives only and have the same fat composition.

      Olive Pomace
      oil is the main cooking grade oil. This oil is neutral in taste and flavour,
      thus doesn’t interfere with natural food flavours and blends brilliantly with Indian
      cuisine. You can use this oil for any kind of cuisine and any kind of cooking (roasting,
      baking, grilling, frying, etc.). It gives great results while deep frying as it
      has a very high smoke point of 238 degrees, which is highest amongst all
      culinary oils. High smoke point allows multiple reuse of oil, one just needs to
      filter it after every use. It’s a viscous oil, so you require only 1/3rd
      the quantity of other oils while cooking.

       It’s healthy, has no pungent smell or flavour,
      doesn’t interfere with natural food flavours, has very high smoke point, is perfect
      for deep frying, is used in 1/3rd the quantity of other oils, goes
      well with all cuisines and cooking methods. Isn’t it all you wanted from your
      cooking oil??

  • Regina Carasig

    if there’s any truth to all of this then why is it still being sold in the market. 

    • Divya

      Very true, Regina! There seems to be a lot of unnecessary controversy. But I suppose that is true of any product on the shelves. There are always competitors who try to cast doubt on perfectly decent products. Anyway, the statements defending pomace in these comments seem reasonable – and that is probably the truth of it.  

  • Tpmy_PW

    I’M glad that I finally took the time to find out what really is Pomace Olive Oil.  I too purchased once or twice this product because of the price, noticed the difference in taste and vowed never to purchase again solely on that.  I have been using Olive oil before it became popular and the prices began to rise.  I had no idea that I was purchasing such an inferior product.  It’s funny I never purchased the soy blend because of price but fell for this product.  Well you live and learn and we should always follow our instincts.  Cheap just is not worth it!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • mohammad shariq

    a good researched article no doubt. i had bought one olive  pomace oil recently and was worried what really pomace stands for. i will certainly be more carefull next time.